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of the people i interviewed in bosnia, for the boss knee began chapter of the book was a professor there. he had a quote that i realized was kind of encapsulating part of what i was saying. that is a bullet can kill a man. but the ideas behind the bullet can kill thousands. and so that was part of what went in to the idea of "kill the messenger," not journalists, certainly, not mass media, certainly, but particular paradigms that have been used to forward these destructive ideas and destructive ends. so where is the power? power is first rooted in information and ideas. and they are so powerful the information ideas i call them the dna for society. so you know how our bodies are all our organs know what to do because the dna is the information it tells them how to function a system? societies are like a system and we're like the parts that are decoding the information, about idea is and participating in our society and our system as a result. that information is flawed in the body like that dna gets a mutation, it doesn't go so well for the body. just like it doesn't go so well for society. it c
. not everybody may agree with me on those things. and, one of the people i interviewed in boss bosnia, was a professor there and he had quote that i realized was kind of encapsulating what i was saying. a bullet can kill a man, the idea behind the bullet can kill thousands. and so that was part of what went in to the idea of kill "kill the messenger." not journalists, not mass media, but particular paradigmed that had been used to forward these destructive ideas and destructive ends. so where is the power rooted? power is first rooted in information and ideas. and they are so powerful these information ideas, i call them the dna for society. so you know how our bodies are all of our organs know what do because the dna is the information it tells them how to function in a system? well, society are like a system and we're like the parts that are decoding the information, and the ideas and participating in our society in our system has a result. when that information is flawed in our body, that dna gets a mutation, it doesn't go so well for the body just like it doesn't go so well for so
really when we talk of the failures of somalia, of rwanda, of boss bosnia, and try to explain in the book the difficulties we have, the unwillingness of governments. we made mistakes. we could have done things differently. but in the investigations that i have done on rwanda and also bosnia and rwanda in particular said there was a reason for failure was lack of will to act and change. and i think when we look at these, we have to consider context. i'm taking a tough time to answer your question. i think it's important that the in somalia, where the president bush's father sent in thousands of soldiers to feed hungry somalis, it was an incredible noble initiative. he it it at the time of the elections. and the soldiers went in and did whatever they could. of course, the somalis were fight and resisting and sometimes you had food in warehouses, but you couldn't get to the people. they came in and broke up that lock jam so that we can feed the people. and then they -- the operation [inaudible] and u.s. troops. but the troops which lead somalia were not just the u.s. troops, almost every wes
on bosnia, and are a want day d.a. says the overwomenning reason for failure was the look of will to act, and i think when we look at these, since we have to consider context, i'm taking a bit of time answer you question because i think it's important. in somalia, where president bush's father sent in thousands of soldiers to feed hungry somalis, it was an incredible noble initiative. he did it at the time of the elections. he was leaving office but the took the decision, and these soldiers went in and did whatever they could, but of course the somalis were fighting and resisting and sometimes you had food in warehouses, but you can't get it to the people. so they came in and broke up that log jam so we can feed the people. and then later on in the operation, the blackhawk was shot done, and u.s. withdrew its troops. but the troops which led somalia were not just the u.s. troops. almost every western government withdrew their troops. so the best trained and the best armed troops left somalia, and in the end, the oppression collapsed. we had to close it down. this was end of '93. and begi
really when we talk of the failures of somalia, of rwanda, of bosnia, and i try to state in the book the difficulties we have, we made mistakes in the secretary of. we could have done things differently, but in the investigations that i have done on rwanda and also lost me at and were wanted in particular the overwhelming reason for failure is lack of will to act and to intervene i'm taking time to answer questions because i believe in somalia when president bush's father went in, thousands of soldiers -- hungry somalis. he did it at the time of the elections. the soldiers went in and did whatever they could and of course the somalis were resisting and sometimes you have food and warehouses but you couldn't get it to the people so they came and broke the logjam so we could feed people. and then they had thrown in the operation, the blackhawk showdown and we withdrew the troops but the true's which left somalia were not just the u.s. troops. almost every western government went through their troops so the best armed troops in somalia in the end collapse and we had to close it down. th
to be careful not to use it as an alibi. really, when we talk of the failures of somalia, rwanda, bosnia, and i tried to explain the unwillingness of government and troops -- we made mistakes. we could have done things differently. in the investigations that i had gone to do on rwanda and rwanda in particular said that the only reason for failure was lack of will to act a day when we look at this, since we also have to consider context and taking enough time to answer your question because i think it's important -- and somalia where president bush's father sent in thousands of soldiers to feed hungry samoans, it was an incredible and noble initiative. he did it at the time of the elections and he was leaving office, but he took that decision and the soldiers went in and did whatever they could. of course, this mollies were fighting in unresisting, and sometimes you have food in warehouses, but you couldn't get it to the people. so they came in and broke up that locked down so that we could feed the people. and then they threw in the operation, black hawk was shut down and the u.s. relinquished
blame the u.n. we only to find a better way. of course somalia, rwanda, bosnia, experiences. that was one of the reasons why i felt as international community we need to find a way of tackling these crisis, and that led to the responsibility to protect. >> host: talk will bit more. we have an extraordinary count in the book in january of 1994. receiving a cable from an informant who basically told you exactly what was born to happen, and it did happen. so the idea that things take effect, you have the information. yourself spent time calling heads of governments to ask for more troops. >> yes. a force commander met with an informant who claimed at the time to have the permission that the plan to kill. there was an arms cache. it was the mass of about. he knew had been collected. he could take it to the location. thought about it and felt maybe he should go at it do it. we have headquarters and advised him to be careful. you don't have the mandate of the means. it sometimes just one of the most difficult decision for peacekeeper. if he have limited resources than the others c
, it was also the first to unite europe. >> if you are 20 and lived in bosnia-herzegovina, you most certainly grew up in the middle of a terrible war. some 100,000 people died in the mid-1990's in the conflict. after yugoslavia disintegrated, there were fears tensions over religious and ethnic identities in the region. in the capital, sarajevo, these tensions persist even today. one swiss none is trying to help the young generation overcome them. >> sarajevo, 6:00 in the morning. the system leaves her franciscan cloister and starts her way to work. sarajevo is a multicultural city. the skyline is full of minarets, and church towers and synagogues, but it is still divided by faith and ethnicity. she does youth ministry work for young people of all faiths, an unusual job these days. it is the morning conference at a drug addiction prevention association. social workers are muslims, catholics, and a piece. she does not know the release of her fellow care givers. >> we do not talk about it. that is what makes our situation special. >> the bosnian war ended in 1995, but tensions from the conflict
operations of its 90s. rwanda and bosnia. >> rose: you view that as a mistake. >> and iraq. not as a mistake as such, but it was our failure. our failure in the sense that we couldn't help or do as much as we could to protect the people. and often they say it's the u.n.'s fault or they didn't give-- but as i explaiin the book, the u.n. has no standing army. we need to rely on governments to give us the troops we want. we often go in lightly armed with lightly armed troops. and we ourselves have to the been able to lower expectation and explain to the people what we are there for. so sometimes they would expect a couple of battalions of the u.n. to do incredible things, you know. i mean and when the failure comes, our member states don't speak up, you know. it's the organization, the seretary-general and the team and i try to explain to people that there are two u.n.s. the u.n. made up of member states who give us the mandate and the secretariat that implements it. and we can be as the organization can be as strong as the member states want it to be. and in both situations, we didn't have eno
diplomacy but also fiercely criticized for failing to stop the bloodshed in rwanda, bosnia, and most recently in syria. in his new book former u.n. secretary general kofi annan attempts to shape how history will remember his 40 years at the united nations. >> well, i hope that it will be said that he made a contribution. >> reporter: his name will forever be attached to some of the darkest chapters in the u.n. history. he was the head of u.n. peace keeping forces when some 800,000 people were killed in rwanda. the next year more than 8,000 bosnian men and boys were slaughtered in a place designated a so-called u.n. safe area. you said with regards to rwanda and bosnia, we patently failed or were seen to have failed. do you believe you failed. >> of course we failed. not only do i apologize on behalf of the u.n. and on my own behalf. >> reporter: annan writes that the experiences of rwanda and bosnia pushed him to try to shape the into an organization that would, quote, step up rather than standby. >> we've ber veened to make life easier for people living with h.i.v./aids. in the case
of the world. bosnia one year later. thousands are massacred. u.n. peacekeepers do not intervene here either. syria 2012. president bashar al assad orders his army to bomb civilians, and once again, the u.n. security council fails to protect civilians. >> the security council has a hard time living up to people's expectations. when it does not intervene, as is the case in syria, people accuse it of inaction, but when it does, it is accused of having double standards and selectively intervening in some crises but not in others. >> unlike in syria, the security council did intervene in libya to prevent a bloodbath in benghazi. in march 2011, the ordered in international military operation to protect civilians, the beginning of the end for libyan leader muammar gaddafi. but the u.n. does not only make peace -- it also orders peacekeeping operations. these presume that both sides want to lay down their arms. >> studies show that if peacekeeping missions are sent in, peacekeeping missions as 60% to 80% more likely to hold. one current example of a successful un peacekeeping force is the mission t
linger. it could another war. how one woman is healing the wounds of the past in bosnia. we would like to leave something different as a heritage for our children. anncr: this casino's in west virginia. but it makes millions off marylanders every year. now they're running dishonest ads. why? because voting for question seven is a vote to build a... world-class resort casino in maryland. creating thousands of jobs and... ...according to the official department of legislative... services, hundreds of millions for our schools. while saving taxpayer money by cutting casino subsidies. question seven. good jobs and better schools in maryland. not west virginia. ,3 -3 3 map belairfiberwilkensmap 3 a harford county sherrif's deputy is being remembered today.services for 34-year old corporal charles licato are open to the public. in a crash on conowingo rood while on duty.tom rodgers is here with more on where you 3 can pay your respects plus your other top stories of the morning. a viewing for corporal licato will be hell today and tomorrow from 2 to 9 p-m at mc- comas ffneral home in abingd
at school until her father showed up. he has been serving overseas in bosnia for a year. there were a lot of tears and smiles. there he is surprising her and one family is happy to be back together. >> we hope that everything goes, there is no trouble in the world that causes me to come back and out of retirement. >> she is 13. it takes a lot off of her to not have to worry about her father being away. >> her mother coordinated this with the school principal. we love those stories. >>> stay with us, a story of hope and courage, the fight to live another story that we love to tell you about. hearing from people who fought through a devastating diagnosis and managed to overcome the odds. what you can do to help this morning. renovations are complete. the makeover that one station is going to be getting, maybe it will make your commute easier. details straight ahead. >>> another day on the picket line and out of the classroom. a group will gather at a high school to show support for chicago teachers.
to take on into bosnia. mr. tim gegeithner running around as treasury secretary saying that anybody who criticizes china or callt a currency manipulator, which any economist will tell you is is an addictive,e, it is silly. what we had in ohio was a deathbonversion. mr. obama has a l lot of convient politic p positions as an incumbent this ar that will quickly evaporate. the chinese are campaigning for roromney -- >> you are right, i was going to cut you off. peter rici. sh we e had more time. we know we will talk about china again. the number for the week is seve when we switched to fios, we got better tv, better phone, better internet. it was like somebody like took our computer shook all the junk out of it. we're actually getting more for our money with fios. [ male announcer ] it's time to get more for your money. upgrade to verizon fios internet, tv and phone with our best price online. just $84.99 a month guaranteed for one year with no annual contract. there's at least three computers. [ girl 1 ] aablet. [ woman 1 ] couple of gaming systems. we c
. libya is not like a normal western country. it is very tribal. we saw bosnia, we saw all of the chaos there. we predicted the same thing would happen. i predicted this months ago. we armed the groups with understanding their loyalty. one of the groups made part of this attack in the embassy maybe they were happy with qaddafi being gone. >> people predicting experts like yourself how did we have it go so far? >> this ven near this administration is a foreign policy expert is to me another expert we have seen this coming. >> i have sat with him 18 months ago. we are talking about the potential of born to libya al qaeda coming in undermining the very essence of this revolution. they were not ready for this democracy. you are seeing elements which are anti american taking over the arab spring. >> thank you for your insight this morning. if you are just waking up the embassy in yemen was also stormed by protestors. we will be back in two minutes. briefs for charity to prove how great the fit is even under a fantastic dress. the best protection now looks, fits and feels just like underwear.
was the best writer in the business. >> in 1996 mack went to bosnia. they interviewed a woman as she toured her house for the first time in 2 years. >> you see he this here. >> reporter: the story photographed and told quietly and sensitively. >> he shot it so well that the pictures told the story. >> mack and i got an exclusive tour of san san death row. >> i don't remember any time where he came back without achieving what he was out to get. and that says a lot. >> reporter: more recently mack had been not only shooting his stories. he like other photographers edited them and then had enough technical know how to operate a truck and set up for a live report. and he's also been chief photographer helping hire many current photo journalists. for a reporter he's an invaluable. >> he's able to put in perspective the way the story should look and the way it can look better. >> i will say okay, i'll do that but you will look bad. usually if you tell them they will look bad they will change their mind. >> mack said for years he's had the same event. there's a major event. >> and i couldn't get to my
of the past in bosnia. we would like to leave something different as a heritage for our children. new this morning... a zombie way. well not really... but it's part of √°homeland security's√° health pampaign encouraging citizens to better prepare for emergenciis. their theory.... if you're prepared for a zombie attack, the same preparations will help during a hurricane, pandemic, earthquake or ttrrorist attack. last year the federal centers for diseaae connrol and prevention launched a zombie apocalypse social media campaign for the same purpose. organizers always use the zombie theme close to hallowwen. a canadian dance studio is stirring up controversity witt its latest class: pole dancing for kids.the instructor says her classes are about fitness and fun... not sex.she says children who pole dance get an excellent cardiovascular and upper-body workout. "there is nothing provocative. there is nothing sexual about it. it's pure fitness and strength and fun. i mean kids love climbing trees. they will climb anything" anything"kids pole dancing isn't new.just l
on behalf of oppressed muslims. kuwait, kosovo, bosnia, iraq, afghanistan, elsewhere. so to imply that we somehow mistreated muslims which was the premise of the speech and how the iraq war had inflamed the arab world against us. there was no storming of the u.s. embassy in cairo in those days. what we're seeing now is al-qaeda stand developing in libya. meltdown of our relations with egypt. you have riots in yemen. tax on the embassy in tunisia. this entire premise that we want to be loved and respected, we'll apologize is now yielded all of these results and these are the fruits of apology and retreat. lack of confidence in our own principles. >> bret: next up, america diplomats under siege in middle east and how is the media covering all of this? [ male announcer ] after years of celebrations, marie callender's gives you a way to make any day a special occasion. new mini cream pies for one. real whip cream and a cookie-crumb crust. marie callender's. it's time to savor. >>> there is a general feeling out there that the president, i think among the press corps, generally, not everybody
brown, who was killed in an airplane accident in bosnia years ago, his son michael brown. where has he stumbled along the way? >> well, michael brown is not his father's son -- well, he is his father's son, but is not a ron brown. he has run successfully on his father's reputation, as a legislator, he is pedestrian. but he is best known for failure to pay his income taxes from the city or the federal government. he had some leens placed against his property, but he had paid them now. he has had some difficult with his finances. he was convicted of campaign finances himself by funneling money through a senator's campaign through individuals who actually were reimbursed for their payments. he gave them money to give to the campaign, and then they got reimbursed. i was convicted of that by the federal government. -- he was convicted of that by the federal government. >> let's go back for a minute to the chairman of the council, quak brown. -- kwami brown. what did he do wrong, and why is he going to prison? >> it is interesting about kwame brown, and it tells you sms about the institution
. bosnia. a state of emergency declared as forest fires threaten homes and residents joining firefighters to gain control over the flames and the fire chief on the verge of real disaster if aerial assistant doesn't soon. spain putting out hot spots and wildfires in the sol region. one person dead and 4,000 people forced to evacuate. 600 square miles of land burned in the worst wildfires season ever. mexico, mommy's grab your turtles. female turtles making the trip to the beach and digging deep holes and laying eggs befored hading back out to sea. that is a wrap on this fox trip in the world in 80 seconds. >> i am harris falker. it is the report. isaac is gone. but the damage to louisiana not over yet. brand new video shows flooded homes and people forced to await rescue from roop tops. evacuation is in affect over fears of a lock on a flood caninal could fail. governor mitt romney rolling in florida. and congressman paul ryan is also there. they attacked president obama's proposed cut to the military . president obama making a pair of stops in the swing state of the iowa where he attacked
down or ahmadi or bosnia and that is a deficit. if you want to read about the american experience in iraq. it's also true and i spent hours sipping tea with iraqi tribal leaders have been inside the green zone or stepped foot on one of the vast american bases on the pentagon's private contractors building the country. where did that stop me from writing regularly when i called and still call a american cigarettes, when most of the people who visit those bases didn't consider places with 20-mile perimeters, the canon mercenary person who knows what else to be particularly noteworthy structures on the iraqi landscape and so with rare exceptions worth commenting on. and certainly no expert on the shiites and sunnis. i'm a little foggy on my iraqi geography and never seen the tigris or euphrates rivers pitt on the other hand, it does occur that a whole lot to the american spun and officials and military types have done all of the above, spent time up close and personal for a piece in the american version couldn't have arrived at the last many years. the first-hand experience, but has
the gaze of the u.n. peace keeping operation." and ethnic cleansing in bosnia including the massacre at u.n.-designated safe areas >> in all these cases, part of the reasons for failure perhaps was the true nature of the crisis. the resources that would be required and exaggerated expectations of what the u.n. troops can do >> brown: particularly in cases where it becomes a civil war, right? >> exactly. brown: it becomes clear in the book especially as you look at this period that you took these failures personally >> yes, i took it personally in the sense that often we saw the human suffering. you saw the traumas that people livedded through and wonderd what it would take to move us as a humanity to help in these dangerous and sad situations. you cannot see the conditions on the ground and not feel it intensely. as one of my predecessors said, our objective is not to take people to heaven but to prevent humanity from going to hell. that's a tough job. it's something you do every day. you have to wake up every day ready to start again. >> brown: you're saying that governments have not don
,000 casualties and 100,000 rape cases in bosnia for three years. the u.n. was idle for three years. i talked to his excellency, secretary-general ban ki-moon yesterday and he went and apologized because of the inability of united nations in the 1990s. i am afraid that maybe after 20 years another u.n. secretary general will have to go to syria and apologize to the syrian people because of this inactivity, this idleness of international community. therefore we must act together. >> warner: mr. minister, thank you so much. thank you for having us. >> thank you. thank you very much. >> ifill: now, to another of our american graduate reports. this week, the "newshour" is offering a series of stories and interviews about the nation's high school drop out crisis. ray suarez talks with the nation's top teacher. >> suarez: how do you engage children? reduce the chances they'll drop out and increase their chances of success? tonight we talk to the 2012 teacher of the year, rebecca mieliwocki. she teaches seventh grade english at luther burbank middle school. rebecca, is this something you can feel yo
. he was in bosnia. his daughter audrey had no idea dad would be meeting her at school. >> she is going to freak out and probably start crying too. i am quite sure. probably a whole range of emotions. >> did you know anything? >> no. i was confused. >> you were confused, what do you mean? >> i just saw a bunch of people come in. i was really confused. my dad was home. i am happy. >> the major says now that he is home he plans on laying around and watching spongebob with his daughter. i do that too. audrey's mom set up the surprise with the school's principal. seems to have come off without a hitch. sunny, you have got to love that one, huh? >> i know. i cry every time i see them. i don't know if it is that i am a mom or just. hopefully we'll see a lot of the stories, right. apparently by 2014, at least the plan is our troops will be coming home from afghanistan. so. >> if that story doesn't put a smile on your face, something's up. >> i know. i know. well, speaking of homecomings. here is some good news from down in texas. banana has been found. yes, not a fruit, but, but a python. bana
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 64 (some duplicates have been removed)